48 hour Vigil for Homeless LGBT

“Three hours in to our 48 hour vigil… It’s 43 degrees lgbt youth nonprofitoutside.”

Lost-n-Found Youth, a nonprofit which we support, is having a 48 hour vigil this weekend to allow people to truly understand what it means to be young and homeless.

Stop by their Facebook page, see the videos, and please get involved. You could change a life.

Today also begins a 140 mile journey for Dr. Mark Sweatman, an amputee who lost his leg in 2010. He will lead a 140-mile walk around and through Atlanta for the next 9 days in support of lgbt youth. Learn more: The Long Walk Home.

Stonewall Veterans Kickoff Compassion Relay

Erica Kay-Webster and David Bermudez, veterans of the Stonewall rebellion in NYC, kick off a Global Compassion Relay from Cape Cod, Massachusetts and pass it on to AIDS/LifeCycle riders in San Francisco, to Los Angeles, Tanzania, Botswana and around the world to reach the opening of the 2014 Compassion Games on September 11, 2014.

To learn more about the activities planned in your city visit CompassionGames.org

 

 

GiveOUT Day with Brandon Shire

Cropped Give Out Day Final Logo Rectangle with Tagline ColorToday I have the pleasure of hosting the annual GiveOUT Day over at Smoocher’s Voice. We’re raising $2000 for homeless lgbt children (and we’re halfway there!). You can win prizes, meet new people and help us reach our goal by giving to the part of our LGBT community that need it most. Stop by, have some fun, win some prizes. And even if you can’t give, please help us share the event.

mm romance for lgbt youth fundraising

21 Gay Writers talk about The Other Man

Welcome writer and editor Paul Fahey, who I invited to the blog after readers nominated the award-winning, The Other Man: 21 Writers Speak Candidly About Sex, Love, Infidelity, & Moving On for a 2014 LGBT Book Gem

From the beginning, this project has been a labor of love, especially since the charity involved, the It Gets Better Project, is one near and dear to all our hearts. (A portion of the proceeds from sales of the anthology goes to It Gets Better.)

Here’s how the book happened:

The Other ManIn 2010, I met writer, Victoria Zackheim, editor of The Other Woman, at a local writer’s conference. I was immediately fascinated by her book of essays and asked if anyone had considered editing an anthology on the subject from the male viewpoint. To Victoria’s knowledge, no one had written a follow up and she immediately gave me her blessings to edit the gay companion to her wonderful book.

I immediately sent out invitations to some of my favorite male writers and asked them to contribute to the anthology. In the process, I discovered that writers either had an other man story to tell or they didn’t. It was that simple. Eventually I had a strong list of contributors and we were off and running. By early 2011, I had written a detailed book proposal, acquired an agent, the wonderful Jill Marsal of the Marsal/Lyon Literary Agency, and had a complete list of contributors attached to the book. [Read more…]

LGBT Music Monday – Father Christmas Knows

Love this new song about a homeless kid at Christmas. Listen to the words. December proceeds from this song are donated to the Albert Kennedy Trust to aid homeless LGBT youth.  Happy Holidays!

Love Me As I Am – Gay Nonfiction

Love meLove Me As I Am is an anthology of 24 biographies and letters written by gay men as they reflect on the childhood experiences that shaped their lives. These experiences are something which many gay men can relate to. The stories share the common threads of invalidation, being overwhelmed by shame and the painful (but worthwhile) journey to self-acceptance.

All profits gained through sales of the book are donated to Diversity Role Models — a UK charity tackling homophobia through education.

From Amazon. Learn more here.

Love Me As I Am – gay men reflect on their lives from Little Red Shoes on Vimeo.

10 Misconceptions About Homeless LGBTQ Youth

homeless teensOn any given night, there are between 500 and 2000+ local homeless gay youth trying to survive on the street. They may be right in your small hometown, or in the nearest city. Nationally, the numbers are estimated to be between 100k-250k+ homeless lgbt kids living on the street. We’re going to dispel some of the myths and misconceptions about homelessness and lgbt youth.

Assumption: I never see them, those numbers can’t be true. [Read more…]

Reached! $1000 goal for Homeless LGBT Youth

We did it!

I am extremely pleased to announce that we have reached our fundraisng goal of $1000 for homeless kids in Atlanta.

LGBT Fundraising MM Romance

 

We’ll be continuing our fundraising efforts and you can still donate to either of the groups below.

Thanks to everyone that supported our efforts!

lgbt youth nonprofit  lgbt nonprofit

The hardest lessons

“You can’t save everyone.” 

These were the hardest four words I ever heard in my life and they were given to me by a spiritual mentor who picked me up from the floor and held me after I heard the news of the suicide of a very close personal friend. I have never gotten over the death of my friend, but her death prompted change in my own life and in the lives of others that were touched by her presence. 

This month, Lost-n-Found was informed of the death of a young man who approached them for help, and then left the program because he didn’t think he could stop doing drugs. I don’t work directly with the LnF board, or any of the volunteers. I’m just one of those spreading the news about the work they do. But I know personally how something like this hits you. Hard and below the belt.  [Read more…]

This is what homeless LGBT kids wake up to every day

Last year Lost-n-Found shared a video of a ‘squat’ for homeless lgbt youth. People seemed shocked at how these kids lived and even more shocked at what they had to do to survive. One year later Lost-n-Found returned to the squat to see what had changed for these kids. As you can see from the video, not too much has changed despite the heroic efforts of LnF.  Is it because they haven’t tried? No. If anything, the volunteers are more dedicated, more active, and pushing harder to make changes.

And still the number of homeless lgbt kids has increased. The revised estimate for 2013 is that there are approximately 750 homeless LGBT children on the streets of Atlanta.  62% of these kids will attempt suicide.  When you wake up to this every day, is there any doubt as to why that number is so high?

You can Donate here or at the Lost-n-Found website

LGBT Fundraising MM Romance